Bengali Girls don’t by L.A. Sherman

* Picture from Amazon*

Format read: Paperback

Genre: Memoir

Rating: 5 out of 10

Plot: This is the story of Luky, a Bangladeshi girl born during the War of Independence from Pakistan.  Luky grows up mainly in England where she rebels against the strict rules set by her parents.  When Luky’s rebellion pushes her parents too far, they decide it’s time for her to get married: they trick her into visiting Bangladesh under the premises she’s visiting a dying uncle while in reality, it’s for her marriage.  She spends the next couple of years feeling trapped in a place where she’s supposed to behave as a traditional Bengali wife.

Opinion: I thought the first part of this book was interesting, but when it got to the part where she moved to Bangladesh, it got weird.  First, there were the parts written in italics where it was almost like she was talking to a therapist about her life.  Second, the whole book aside from the italic conversations where written in third person, which is a very awkward way to read a memoir and it made it difficult to connect with the author.  Third, the author unexpectedly fast forwards to her living in the United States and being divorced with no satisfying explanation about what happened to her marriage or really how she ended up in the U.S.  I think there’s so many good memoirs out there about South Asian women that it’s better to just skip this one.

Next book: In the Unlikely Event by Judy Blume